This Year’s Best Email Newsletters

0


the best email newsletters

Most of us don’t have a ton of time to sift through everything to find the best ideas on the internet, on top of all our other obligations. And I don’t know about you, but my inbox is more crowded every day.

So, I’m always on the lookout for the best email newsletters—the ones I can rely on to be the right combination of informative and truly insightful, especially for entrepreneurs and small business owners.

So here are the best reads I’ve found this year:

Swipe File

Jimmy Daly, the author of Swipe File, is the marketing director at Animalz. Animalz is a content marketing company for software-as-a-service, tech, and crypto companies. He previously worked with GetVero and Quickbooks in the marketing department.

An experienced marketer, Daly identifies the four best articles he read that week and gives a brief description of each. This one stood out to me.

“In every issue of Swipe File, there is at least one thing that changes the way that I work or the way I think about work,” says Val Geisler, a professional email marketer. “The internet is full of crappy newsletters that deliver zero value. Swipe File is not one of those.”

Anyone with a company involved in content marketing should keep up with Swipe File. Daly gives you several pertinent articles about marketing, saving you time and verifying what tactics will help your business the most. Go here to sign up.

Emergent

“There’s a lot of great content out there, but there’s also a lot of mediocre content,” says Noah Parsons, COO of Palo Alto Software and creator of Emergent. “We’re taking the tact of going a little further and pulling in things that are off the beaten track and hopefully a little bit more surprising and interesting than getting the same genre of content every single month.”

Parsons also wants the Emergent newsletter to share Palo Alto Software’s personality. He wants to make the company more transparent by sharing things employees find intriguing that don’t pertain directly to business planning.

“Our site talks about our products and what we offer, but doesn’t give a lot of insight into the behind-the-scenes of what we find interesting as a company,” he says. “We have a wider interest-set than the more narrow focus of what our products offer.” Sign up here.

Moz Top 10

93 percent of business-to-business (B2B) businesses do content marketing, but only 5 percent feel like their efforts are effective. Moz publishes a semi-monthly newsletter called The Moz Top 10.

When I began my content marketing internship, I immediately subscribed to The Moz Top 10. Twice a month, I get 10 articles sent straight to my inbox, many of which have changed how I write and construct content—useful information for any small business or startup that’s figuring out how to be found in Google search. Sign up here.

Dan Pink

Dan Pink has written many books about business and behavior, several of which are NY Times bestsellers. He continues to write books while publishing a newsletter every other Tuesday—it boasts more than 150,000 subscribers.

Like Emergent, his newsletter has three sections—a changing assortment of tips, suggestions, and recommendations relating to business in different ways. Topics involve articles, podcasts, TV shows, gadgets, and more.

John Procopio, Palo Alto Software’s director of marketing, says: “I don’t always have the time to read all the newsletters in my inbox, but I still want to keep up with business news and trends. Dan Pink’s newsletter gives me the most bang for my buck because the video leaves you thinking—articles can’t always do that.” Sign up here.

The Hustle

The Hustle is a daily newsletter that has a pulse on growing startups and corporate dramas.

“The Hustle really cuts through because they somehow just know how to get to the root of what I’m looking for and they give it to you straight,” says Alyssa Powell, Palo Alto Software’s digital media marketing specialist. “I don’t know how they do it, but the way that they write is just phenomenal. Their branding shows through on all different platforms and communities.”

But it’s not the Wall Street Journal. They’re trying a new model for news-sharing, and it seems to be working, based on their incredible subscriber numbers. Sign up here.

CB Insights

The CB Insights newsletter gives me key reports and takeaways in a graphically pleasing way,” says Edward Silva, a marketing intern turned Stanford MBA student. “Other newsletters don’t necessarily do that. They just provide me knowledge, but CB Insights turns that knowledge and data into interesting and often funny insights.” Sign up here.

But wait, there’s more!

You’ve all probably heard of these three newsletters—there’s a reason why they are three of the most popular for entrepreneurs and small business owners.

Tim Ferriss, author of five NY Times bestsellers about self-help and personal development, is the author of 5-Bullet Friday. Each week is a surprise, but the topics are always helpful for improving your work-life balance.

Entrepreneur Daily is the ultimate newsletter to keep up with trends and breaking news in the world of business. It’s released every day and talks about a few of the biggest events that took place in the last 24 hours.

Lastly, Kevin Rose has created the extremely popular business newsletter: The Journal. His writing is very conversational, a break from the automated newsletters that usually fill your inbox. He, like Ferriss, includes a few random topics that can benefit your productivity and work-life balance.

What’s the newsletter you can’t live without? Tell us about it on Twitter @Bplans.

Was this article helpful?

Nate Mann
Nate Mann

Nate Mann recently finished his second year at the University of Oregon. He is pursuing a major in journalism, along with minors in business administration and computer science. He is currently a content marketing intern for Palo Alto Software. Outside of school and work, Nate is an avid basketball fan and writes about the Portland Trail Blazers for Rip City Project. He is also a data reporting intern for the University of Oregon’s School of Journalism and Communication.



Source link

Share.

About Author

Leave A Reply

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This